Professional Cosplayer: Yes, it’s a Career!

If you didn’t already know, cosplay is really well-liked. When anime and manga were first made available in stores and on television in the late 1970s, this trend was first noticed by students in Japan and the USA. Because of the unique storylines, vibrant characters, and ridiculously over-the-top performances, imaginative fans came up with costume and makeup ideas to recreate memorable scenes from their favorite episodes.
Costumes worn for entertainment purposes quickly gained importance in and of themselves. To advertise or sell items and increase the number of fans, event planners partnered with major film and television studios to present their programs in a designated hall or convention center on a certain date. The field of professional cosplaying was created when cosplayers unexpectedly emerged as a crucial resource to carry out all this promotion.

How is this a career?

Cosplaying may appear to be a hobby practiced by a group of idle individuals, but there is more to it than meets the eye. In order to establish contacts with businesses and studios that promote on well-known video sharing websites like YouTube or Instagram, many cosplayers have degrees in fashion or social media marketing. The more a cosplayer advertises a certain video game, anime, or film, the more likely it is that they will be invited to official events or film premieres to generate interest among the general public.

Many cosplayers who portray well-known characters or create their own unique identities have degrees in graphic design or photography. In order to reassure their admirers that they are not being forced to pay to watch them perform in public, many cosplayers attempt to downplay their line of work by claiming that what they do is a type of hobby.

How do I get started?

Cosplayers frequently start out with very few materials available. Whatever funds you have will be used to purchase costumes at a discount, wigs, props, and makeup from previous year. Students particularly enjoy creating fan pages on Facebook or Tumblr to rent out costumes or sell their fan art. Do not forget to play it smart on social media. If you are truly serious about becoming a well-known cosplayer, this could be your most crucial support network to help establish your profession.

What must I always remember about this career?

Professional cosplayers place the highest value possible on privacy. Many well-known cosplayers will only have two or three phrases of biographical material on their social media pages. A few people have even spoken out against admirers who started stalking after falling head over heels. Most harassed cosplayers are female, although a small minority of male or transgender cosplayers also encounter online abuse because of how they choose to portray characters. Remember that haters will always have something negative to say; ignore them and wear your costume anyhow!

How genuine your cosplay appears will also determine whether you get ten or more thousand fans. Every detail you put on will be judged by the public, from the coat buttons you utilize to the color of the contacts you wear. If you don’t even have facial hair, you shouldn’t dress up as Wolverine from the X-Men. Also, if you don’t have a red Chinese dress or a replica of her infamous revolver, do not cosplay as Ada Wong from Resident Evil. Simply because their costumes or makeup are flawless and their personas look consistent, cosplayers get notoriety.

Here are some tips for that cosplayer in you!

Do you really need to order that Kamen Rider suit or realistic gun off eBay while making a purchase decision? To save money, consider creating a test version. Additionally, avoid using aluminum foil to simulate a metallic surface because it will readily tear and will not adhere to most forms of glue. Instead, spend your money on a big tub of metallic paint.

When body painting, you can use any reputable brand of powder or water-based paint (excellent worldwide brands include Mehron and BenNye), but it needs skill to apply it to your skin. To determine how long the paint will take to dry and whether you will experience any adverse responses, test it on a small patch of skin on your arm or leg. NEVER SUBSTITUTE ACRYLIC OR OIL PAINTS; they will ruin your day by stopping your skin from breathing normally and causing you to perspire excessively.

When in public – There will always be people who stare, comment, or take pictures. Keep in mind to be self-assured, and if someone asks you a question, please entertain them by responding and avoid giving the impression that you’re clueless.

In case of emergency – 

Remember to reserve a private room or place before the event begins and have a companion close by at all times in case your costume begins to sag or begin to fall apart. Try to take a shortcut by visiting the area a day or two before the conference starts because it will get quite busy.

 
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